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Posted on November 1, 2021 4:44 PM by Melissa Gentry
Categories: Homeowner Articles
 
The holidays are just around the corner, and for many people, that means lots of festivities with friends and loved ones. With all of the merriment that’s sure to ensue, it’s important that residents who are hosting celebrations are not only considerate of their neighbors, but also take note of the association’s rules. A complete listing of our association rules and regulations can be found in our Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&Rs), but here are a few key items to look up that are particularly pertinent during the holiday season:
 
Outdoor Decorations: Decking the halls with seasonal ornaments is a great way to bring the holiday spirit home. Many love to spread the joy by decorating the outside of their homes and front yards as well, but before you scurry up that ladder to hang the decorative lights along the side of your roof, take a quick peek at the CC&Rs to find out the guidelines for outdoor decorations, as well as the guidelines for flags and signs if you plan on decorating with those. This will help make sure your outdoor winter wonderland isn’t an association violation.
 
Parties: We hope you all have plenty of chances to eat, drink and be merry this holiday season. If you plan on hosting a large get-together or party, there are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind. First, keep the revelry and noise to a minimum, and wind the party down at a reasonable time—you don’t want your celebrating to interfere with your neighbors’ attempts to get visions of sugar plums dancing in their heads. Check your CC&Rs to find out what the association deems acceptable noise levels and what the quiet hours are, as well as guidelines for hosting parties.
 
Parking: The holidays bring many people together, and that means extra cars will need to be parked. To make sure your guests are covered, look at the CC&Rs to find out the rules on visitor parking in the association, including where they can park and what kind of parking passes they may need.
 
Overnight Guests: It wouldn’t be the holidays without Uncle Marv and Aunt Ethel bunking in little Jimmy’s room. Of course, depending on how long your overnight guests are staying, you may need to let the association know. The CC&Rs will give you a breakdown on the rules for both short-term and long-term guests, so take a look at them before you break out the extra cot.
 
Following the association’s rules and regulations helps ensure that all of our residents can enjoy this special time of year, so please help us by doing your part. Stay safe and have a wonderful holiday season.
 
Posted on October 1, 2021 4:43 PM by Melissa Gentry
Categories: Homeowner Articles
 
Halloween is a kid’s delight. It’s a blast to dress up in costumes, go trick-or-treating, attend parties and, most of all, eat candy.
 
At the same time, Halloween can be scary for parents. Costumes can be dangerous, too much candy can be sickening and walking around at night can be risky.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offer these tips (in anagram form) to make sure your little ghouls and goblins have a safe Halloween:
 
S – Swords, knives and similar costume accessories should be short, soft and flexible.
A – Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Children should walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
F – Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see trick-or-treaters.
E – Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before they’re eaten.
 
H – Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help see and help others see you.
A – Always test make-up in a small area first. Remove it when done to avoid skin irritation.
L – Look both ways before crossing the street. Use established crosswalks wherever possible.
L – Lower the risk for serious eye injury by avoiding decorative contact lenses.
O – Only walk on sidewalks or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
W – Wear well-fitting masks, costumes and shoes to avoid blocked vision, trips and falls.
E – Eat only factory-wrapped candy. Avoid eating homemade treats unless you know the cook.
E – Enter homes only if you’re with a trusted adult.
N – Never walk near lit candles or other open flames. Be sure to wear flame-resistant costumes.
 
If you’re hosting a party or expecting trick-or-treaters:
 
• Provide healthy treats, such as individual packs of raisins, trail mix or pretzels. Offer fruits, vegetables and cheeses to party guests.
• Use party games and trick-or-treating as an opportunity for kids to get their daily dose of 60 minutes of physical activity.
• Be sure walking areas and stairs are well-lit and free of obstacles that could cause falls.
• Keep candle-lit jack-o-lanterns and other open flames away from doorsteps, walkways, landings and curtains. Place them on sturdy tables, keep them out of reach of pets and small children and never leave them unattended.
• Drive safely and watch out for trick-or-treaters.
Posted on September 1, 2021 4:39 PM by Melissa Gentry
Categories: Homeowner Articles
 
If you are an owner who leases your unit, we’d like to make the leasing experience successful and positive for everyone by informing you of your responsibilities. This will help preserve your property value specifically and maintain the association’s property value in general.
 
Your tenants may not be familiar with common-interest community living. Please take a few minutes to explain to them that living in a community association is very different from living in a rental apartment community. Specifically, your tenants, like all residents, are subject to the rules and regulations of the association, and it’s up to you to educate them and see that they comply. The association will assist you in this area, but the responsibility lies with you. We recommend you provide your tenants with written copies of all policies and rules and advise them on the proper use of the association’s facilities. You can obtain copies of these and other useful documents from the manager.
 
We strongly recommend that you have a written lease agreement with your tenant. As a lessor (landlord) of a home in a community association, the lease you use must require tenants to comply with the association’s governing documents. In the event your tenant fails to comply with these documents, including the bylaws, or its rules and regulations, a representative of the association will first contact your tenants in an attempt to remedy the problem. The association will send you a copy of any notice sent to your tenant.
 
If the tenant does not correct the violation, the association will contact you and expect you to remedy the violation using the recourse available to you through your lease agreement. If you are unable to correct the violation, the association may pursue appropriate legal action against the tenant, and possibly against you.
 
The association asks that you provide the manager with the names and contact information of your tenants. The association will add your tenants to its mailing list, and they will receive the newsletter, invitations to participate on committees, notices of social activities and general association-related information. This information will also be used in case of emergency.
 
Follow these simple steps and you, the tenants and the association will all have a positive community association living experience:
· Provide your tenants with copies of association rules.
· Educate tenants about the need to follow association rules, and see that they comply.
· Advise tenants on the proper use of association facilities.
· Use a written lease agreement.
· Make sure your lease requires tenants to comply with all association governing documents.
· Provide the association with contact information for your tenants.
 
Renters: If you don’t have a copy of the association rules or you’d like more information about the association, please contact a board member or manager.
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